GRAMMAR NOTES: NOUNS

RED LEAVES

GRAMMAR NOTES: NOUN CLUSTER





Half of the morphologic elements are grouped into the “noun cluster”; they are: nouns, articles, adjectives, pronouns, and numerals. Nouns are used to represent people, animals, things, and abstract notions. Articles are noun determiners, only, and they cannot exist by themselves. Adjectives qualify or determine nouns—again, only nouns. 
 
LSEG: verb cluster

Pronouns
are needed to replace the nouns in a convenient manner, in order to avoid annoying repetitions. Lastly, numerals have a “true noun designation” as their first nature.
 

LSEG: unbiased sentence elements





Overall, it is very important to understand noun’s nature in order to control the complex functionality of “equivalent nouns”—other morphologic elements working as nouns.


The capital importance of the noun is due to the fact that it explains grammatical category of "case". Unfortunately, many English grammar books do not present grammatical category of case; even worse, of those few English grammar books that do trouble to present the case, they employ all sorts of poetical/fantastic "simplifications", instead of a simple, logic, precise, straightforward grammatical functionality.

Without knowing the mechanism of case there is no way of understanding Grammar (as a complex aggregate of Sentence Syntax, Morphology, Complex Sentence Syntax, Punctuation). Anyway, it needs to be highlighted that there are morphological cases, and syntactical ones, as follows:GREEN LEAF L

A. Morphological cases

A1. genitive;
A2. vocative [also known as "nominative of address"];

B. Syntactical cases

B1. nominative;
B2. accusative;
B3. dative.

NOTE
Each case explains specific grammatical functions (quite complex), and they are the very definition of Grammar--of any Grammar. The point to note is, no grammar book in the entire World (regardless of its language) explains grammatical category of case as thorough and logic as LSEG4 does. However, if any person/specialist/professor/author anywhere in the World doubts our words, just write to us: we are ready to sustain our affirmations in a public debate!

Well now, our challenge is nothing new. Since 2005, when Logically Structured English Grammar was first released to the public, nobody dared to challenge us using grammatical arguments. Naturally, we are still waiting  but . . . Anyone . . . anywhere . . . ?


The English noun changes its form in order to reflect correctly grammatical category of number. Consequently, there are a few "number agreement relations" [this is a primitive morphologic functionality] between a noun and other morphologic elements, as follows:
      A. noun - article number agreement;
      B. noun - determining adjective number agreement;
      C. (antecedent) noun - pronoun number agreement;
      D. (subject) noun - (predicate) verb number agreement.


In addition, there are a few "gender agreement relations" developed between:
      a. noun - determining adjective gender agreement;
      b. (antecedent) noun - pronoun gender agreement.

[As a note, the morphologic agreement relations can be way more complex in other languages.]


NOUNS GRAMMATICAL CATEGORIES






Fragment from LSEG4: grammatical categories that are investigated when analyzing the morphologic noun.


GREEN LEAF R


ABSTRACT NOUNS
Fragment from LSEG4: each grammatical category that applies to nouns is presented in minute details in definitions, rules, graphic charts, diagrams, tables, and exercises.

Attention: in one syntactic sentence, the meaning starts from a noun working as "the subject". Further, the predicate describes an action executed by the noun-subject, or a state of the noun-subject.

THE CASE OF THE NOUN
In  most grammar books the case of the noun is presented disastrously simplified, due to the fact "the English noun does not change its form for case declension".

However, the "form" of the noun has absolutely nothing to do with grammatical category of "case"! Each case is identified based only on "functionality".

L4EW EXERCISES FROM THE NOUNS CHAPTER





Fragment from L4EW: exercises from "Nouns" chapter.

L4EW: EXERCISES FROM NOUNS CHAPTERGREEN LEAF R





Fragment from L4EW: exercises from "Nouns" chapter.

 


LSEG 4TH EDITION
RED LEAF L





A complete grammatical reference, very easy to learn: Logically Structured English Grammar 4—as theory plus exercises!

 
 
 
 
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Page last updated on: February 04, 2017
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