ENGLISH GRAMMAR QUESTIONS
 
 
NAVIGATION PANEL
HOME PAGE
GRAMMAR BOOKS
GRAMMAR NOTES
QUESTION #11
» READERS' QUESTIONS
GREEN LEAF R

QUESTION #11 - FORMING ADVERBS' DEGREES OF COMPARISON

GREEN LEAVES
Date: [this is an updated old posting, previous to LSEG4 edition]
Q11: ". . . I had a discussion with my colleges at work on this subject. This is an example of an adverb when 'y' is changed to 'i' and then adds 'er' and 'est': 'easy - easier - easiest'.

The adjective, 'simple' is OK regarding the degrees of comparison it takes: 'simple - simpler - simplest'. What about the adverb 'simply'? Is it correct to say: 'simply - simplier - simpliest'?

According to the spelling tool, this is not OK. This means,  the adverb 'simply' does not have comparative and superlative or it becomes adjective in this gradation
[sic]?"

From V S  - New Zeeland

A11. Most of our readers consider that English grammar is not so difficult to handle; all you have to do is, search for a few good grammar sites on the Internet, and you solve, quickly and for free, all grammatical problems you may encounter. Well, it doesn't work that way, dear readers. The Internet is a . . . it is full of stupid, trivial "things". You will never find true knowledge for free on the Internet. The only good thing about the Internet is, it helps us discover the books and the documents we need. Further from there, you have to pay--we all do that.

Another problem is the "spelling tools" we use. Dear readers, any grammar check software will work in 90% of all instances--this is, regardless of how good a grammar check software tool is, or could be. The rest of 10% are incorrect instances, because they are based on interpreting the "meaning": no software tool will ever manage to understand the English meaning appropriately. Therefore, great caution is strongly recommended when you rely only on software to correct your messages.

The question above may appear simple, but it is rather complex. It would take us one hour of studying LSEG4, and then another hour to write the appropriate answer. Yes, we do study LSEG4 for correct answers, just as anybody else, because English grammar is no joke. Therefore, our answer to V.S. was fairly brief and abrupt, as follows.

The first thing we do when we perform a grammatical analysis is, we look at the meaning of the words, and sentences. The "meaning" is the first and the most important reference in English grammar. Following, we use Morphology, and then Sentence Syntax, to finalize our investigations.

Now, it is of capital importance to highlight that the English adverbs take two forms:

1. adjectival (easy, sure, cold, hard, slow)
2. adverbial (easily, surely, coldly, hardly, slowly)

However, not all adverbs have both forms: some have only one form, either the adjectival or the adverbial one. Please be very careful when using adverbs, because there are adjectives and even nouns having exactly the same forms as the adverbs do.

The second thing you need to know about adverbs is, there are a few very important rules regarding two consecutive adverbs: one of them has to be in the adjectival form. Please study LSEG4 for details and examples.

GREEN LEAF RThe third important aspect is, not all adverbs form "degrees of comparison". In addition, there are adverbs that have the "superlative" already embedded into their meaning, therefore they do not form, again, degrees of comparison. Note that using the English adverb correctly is a tough issue. There are very many well-known authors, having tens of books published, which do not use the adverb correctly.

The fourth important aspect is, the adverbs form their comparison degrees according to the following rules:

1. synthetic comparison (or the Saxon one) for monosyllable adverbs plus "early";
2. analytic comparison (or the French/Norman one) for polysyllable adverbs.

In LSEG4 are presented about ten groups/categories of exceptions to the above rules. As a note, LSEG4 has been specifically "designed" to be easily understood. That means, all grammatical mechanisms presented are the essence of simplicity, right to the point.
 
The last difficult aspect, related to using adverbs, is about their position within the sentence structure. Again, the best thing is to study LSEG4. In addition, LSEG4 explains all orthographical changes after adding specific endings to nouns [the "-s" of the plural], to adjectives [the "-er" and "-est"], to adverbs [the "-er", "-est", and "-ly"] and to verbs [the "-ing" form].

As you can see this topic is indeed complex; therefore, our advice to V.S., and to you, is buy LSEG4 and study it for a couple of years. After that, you are going to be an expert in English grammar.
 

LSEG4RED LEAF L






The complete, easy to learn, Logically Structured English Grammar 4: theory plus exercises!

RED LEAVES


» ASK A GRAMMAR QUESTION
» LINK TO "LEARN HARDWARE FIRMWARE AND SOFTWARE DESIGN"
» LINK TO "LOGICALLY STRUCTURED ENGLISH GRAMMAR"
» BACK TO TOP
 
 
 
x
Send your comments regarding this page using support@corollarytheorems.com, noi@editcc.com, or cus@2agraph.com
Page last updated on: February 04, 2017
© SC Complement Control SRL. All rights reserved.
 

OUR CANADIAN FLAG

x
 

Valid HTML 4.01!

Site pages valid according to W3C

Valid CSS!

Stylesheets pages valid according to W3C
 
x